Storybrand principle 2: The Problem

This video, is the second in a 7 part series, explaining each part of the Storybrand framework. If you’ve poured your heart into your product or service, but people don’t respond when you tell them about it, the chances are, your messaging is too complicated. And the most powerful weapon we have to combat confusion is the power of story.


Nothing compels the human brain to pay attention, like a great story and the Storybrand framework has been designed to make messaging easy for business owners. The second part of the framework is “The Problem”


Once we’ve defined what our customer wants, next, we need to define what’s getting in the way of what our customer wants, this is where we set the hook. There are actually 3 levels of the problem that we need to speak to in our messaging, watch the video to find out what they are.




Video Transcript


This video is the second in a 7-part series explaining each part of the Storybrand Framework. If you've poured your heart into your product or service but people don't respond when you tell them about it through your marketing, the chances are your messaging is too complicated. And the most powerful weapon we have to combat that confusion is the power of story. Nothing compels the human brain to pay attention like a great story, and the Storybrand Framework has been designed to make messaging easy for business owners. to make messaging easy for business owners. The second part of the framework is The Problem. Once we've defined what our customer wants, see video 1 for that, next we need to define what's getting in the way of what our customer wants, and this is where we set the hook. So, Storybrand principle 2: If you stop talking about your customer's problems, they will stop paying attention to your brand. Now, there are actually three levels of problem that we need to speak to in our messaging: the external problem, internal, and philosophical problems. the external problem, internal, and philosophical problems. The external problem is the thing that's getting in the way of what our customer wants. But, this manifests an internal emotion and that is just plain wrong. Philosophically, plain wrong. It's the internal and philosophical emotions that motivate both B2C and B2B buyers to make a purchase. that motivate both B2C and B2B buyers to make a purchase. Now, we want to drive a nicer car because of the status. We want to buy the right clothes because of how they make us feel when we wear them. We recommend the investment in a new remote working tool for our business because we want to be seen internally as adding value to that organisation. It's in these emotions that you will find the most powerful messaging. And when you can identify the philosophical problem, you will start to win raving fans because you are literally making the world a better place and telling people about it. In order to nail this, you need to think about the bigger why. Why does this matter in the overall epic of humanity? Why does this matter in the overall epic of humanity? In the movie "The King's Speech," the external problem is King George's stutter and this manifests a self-doubt. He doesn't believe he has what it takes to lead his country. Philosophically, though, the stakes are much higher because the king must unify the British people against the Nazis, good versus evil. Brands that give customers a voice in a larger narrative add value to their products by giving their customers a deeper sense of meaning. Once you've nailed this, move on to video 3 in this series where we tackle the third principle: The Guide. If you found this video valuable, subscribe to our YouTube channel so you can refer back to it and catch all of our videos as they are published.

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